Made in Norfolk, CT

As an amateur historian and curator of the things I collect, I feel a bit of a responsibility to try not just to take care of those relics, but whenever possible, share them and return some to where they rightfully belong. This is such an item.

The town of Norfolk has been a wonderful place in which to work and operate a firearms dealership. The customers and the political leaders of the community have been welcoming and friendly to me, as well as supportive of my efforts to operate a store here. I feel a sense of obligation to the town in that when I found out that there was a certain relic of the past available for purchase in Waterbury I went out of my way to acquire it not only for myself, but long term for the town of Norfolk. This pistol was made sometime around 1867 or so in Norfolk, and is so marked on the barrel. It is a pocket revolver in .28 caliber and is significant not only for where it was made, but how it operated in its day.

Icebox Armory - Blog Image 4At a time when muzzle loading of ball and powder was still common this pistol utilized a cup primed, cased cartridge. The first use of metallic cartridges in America was by Smith and Wesson in 1857 with .22 caliber rimfire cartridges. This was an extrapolation of that with a front loaded cup primer cartridge which the hammer impacted through a small space at the rear of the cylinder. Once fired, there was a small hook shaped extraction tool which attached to the screw below the cylinder on the right side of the firearm. This has since been lost. The gun, however, is intact and still functions. It has a 3″ octagonal barrel roll stamped on top, “Conn. Arms Co.; Norfolk, Conn.” The frame is brass and still retains a small amount of the original silver plating it had. The blueing of the barrel is gone and replaced by a brown rust patina. 

I felt it important to bring it back “home” and you can find it on display at the shop. Eventually, it will be turned over to the town historical society. In the meantime an effort will be made to determine exactly where in town it was manufactured.

An update. I have been informed that the manufacturing site was located at what is now the location of the town sewer plant about 1/4 of a mile east of the shop on Rt 44. There are no remnants of the structure however I swear that the old sluice way for the water powered equipment is visible parallel to the river in the woods when the leaves are off the trees. I understand that no casting was done on site so these would have been subcontracted.

2 thoughts on “Made in Norfolk, CT

  1. Joey Bermudez

    Hello sir I have the same gun you are showing on this web page … On my cylinder it is stamped Mar.1st.1864 … Everything is on expt they arm that is located on the side to hold in the round … 28.cal my number is 562)500-0769 : joe will like to sale it … Thank you … Its a very beautiful part of history an has been in my family for over 20yrs …

    Like

    • sapammo

      That would be what is known as a first variant. Mine is a second. I dont know where you are located but my obvious first response to someone that wishes to sell something of that nature is to say, “bring it by!” but if that is not feasable we can make other arrangements. If you were to sell said piece what are your expectations price wise? While interesting to a local such as myself, they are not sought after collector pieces as the cartridge type they used (cup primed), never gained acceptance. Values rarely exceed $100- $150 unless in pristene condition. But if you want to part with it and insure that it stays in the town in which it was made as part of its historical society collection then I would be someone who could make that happen.

      Like

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